Netflix’s GLOW // Women Are Strong As Hell

GLOW opens on Ruth Wilder (Alison Brie), reading for a part in an audition. She emotively delivers a powerful and dramatic monologue, at the end of which the casting director informs her that she had been reading the wrong part—the man’s part. They reset. The casting director leads her in. Ruth performs the women’s audition part:

(knock knock) Sorry to interrupt, your wife is on line two.

This opening scene sets the flavour for GLOW perfectly; the show is a delightfully nostalgia-hazed and also critical and shrewdly observant portrayal of the real-life women’s wrestling circuit of the same name—The Gorgeous Ladies Of Wrestling.

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***WARNING: SPOILERS AHEAD***

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Review: Lana Del Rey’s ‘Lust for Life’

In continuation of our ongoing Girls of Summer music series, E reviews Lana Del Rey’s latest album, Lust for Life.

Beloved dream pop queen Lana Del Rey signaled a shift in her music and mystique with the release of her newest album last weekend. Produced by Polydor/Interscope Records, Lust for Life is presents an evolution of Lana’s ‘awakening,’ both personal and political, and dripping with flower-child pastiche.

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 by Chuck Grant 

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Lorde’s ‘Melodrama’ // On Vulnerability & Power in Pop

Eve Jones examines Lorde’s latest album, Melodrama. Eve is a 19-year-old writer and waitress from Plymouth. Obsessive by nature, she’s always in pursuit of some delicious syntax. This is her first article for Boshemia.

Lorde: explorations of youth and power

In 2013, Lorde, aka Ella Yelich-O’Connor, released her debut album Pure Heroine. Its popularity was hailed by Clash as proof that ‘there’s still an intellectual, polished and important place for pop [music]’. She was 16 at the time. Four years on, Lorde launches back into our minds with Melodrama, which still buzzes with that potential energy—though it hasn’t all been plain-sailing. In a recent interview with The Guardian, she likened her fame-riddled celebrity friendships to ‘having a friend with an autoimmune disease’—‘there are certain places you can’t go together. Certain things you can’t do’. The insensitive analogy received backlash from fans, prompting Lorde to apologise on Twitter. While her conduct has been controversial, her music continues to question youth and power in a dynamic habitat of scorched harmonies, flinty 80s keyboard and lyrical wit.

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‘Melodrama’ by Sam McKinniss

 

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Sigalit Landau // Barbed Hula (2001)

Winding through the tourist scattered streets of Málaga on a Sunday afternoon, sun beating down on me, I headed to El Centre de Pompidou, a smaller branch of the world famous contemporary art gallery in Paris. Making my way through the gallery, I stumbled across many striking exhibits, such as ‘Self Portraits’ which featured feminist icon Frida Kahlo’s The Frame (1938), as well as a sincerely thought provoking exhibit, ‘The Man Without A Face’. However, it was the gallery’s segment for ‘The Political Body’ that struck my attention most. This is where I discovered Sigalit Landau, an incredible Israeli female artist who uses video, sculpting, installation and her own body to create political art. Her art was astounding, but her message was even better.

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Gin With A View || A Review of Gin Festival Torquay

Boshemia loves gin. Period.

Can you imagine our delight when the UK contingent of Boshemia were lucky enough to be invited to GinFestival.com‘s event in Torquay on Friday evening?

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Baby Screams Miracle || A Review

From Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company, Howard Shalwitz presents an ominous production about a rural American family in crisis. In Baby Screams Miracle, Obie-award-winning playwright Clare Barron elegantly weaves a duality of calm and peril into an intimate exploration of prayer and the forces of nature against humanity. The play is a story of survival, familiar only in its investigation of how fragile we are against nature and God. Baby Screams Miracle is a story for the faithful and faithless alike about a family united tenuously by their will to survive. Continue reading “Baby Screams Miracle || A Review”

The Hard Problem || A Review

From the Studio Theatre in Washington, Tom Stoppard’s  The Hard Problem tackles classic thorny debates of philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience with a fresh perspective and ample wit. Directed by Matt Torney, the play is a sterling example of the signature style we have come to expect from Stoppard—a script that doesn’t shy from controversy or high-brow intellect. The Hard Problem is an elegant exploration of the complicated beliefs surrounding consciousness, faith in the divine, and how we endeavor to reconcile the unexplained.

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The cast of The Hard Problem, via Studio Theatre

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