It’s alarming, truly, how disarming she can be // A Personal History Through Lana Del Rey

 

Last week, when Q and E listened to Lust for Life, we got deep in our LDR feels and spent a while recalling our favourite Lana-inspired memories.

Here’s an annotated discography of Lana Del Rey nostalgia.

Photographer:  Nicole Nodland

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Netflix’s GLOW // Women Are Strong As Hell

GLOW opens on Ruth Wilder (Alison Brie), reading for a part in an audition. She emotively delivers a powerful and dramatic monologue, at the end of which the casting director informs her that she had been reading the wrong part—the man’s part. They reset. The casting director leads her in. Ruth performs the women’s audition part:

(knock knock) Sorry to interrupt, your wife is on line two.

This opening scene sets the flavour for GLOW perfectly; the show is a delightfully nostalgia-hazed and also critical and shrewdly observant portrayal of the real-life women’s wrestling circuit of the same name—The Gorgeous Ladies Of Wrestling.

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***WARNING: SPOILERS AHEAD***

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Review: Lana Del Rey’s ‘Lust for Life’

In continuation of our ongoing Girls of Summer music series, E reviews Lana Del Rey’s latest album, Lust for Life.

Beloved dream pop queen Lana Del Rey signaled a shift in her music and mystique with the release of her newest album last weekend. Produced by Polydor/Interscope Records, Lust for Life is presents an evolution of Lana’s ‘awakening,’ both personal and political, and dripping with flower-child pastiche.

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 by Chuck Grant 

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Lorde’s ‘Melodrama’ // On Vulnerability & Power in Pop

Eve Jones examines Lorde’s latest album, Melodrama. Eve is a 19-year-old writer and waitress from Plymouth. Obsessive by nature, she’s always in pursuit of some delicious syntax. This is her first article for Boshemia.

Lorde: explorations of youth and power

In 2013, Lorde, aka Ella Yelich-O’Connor, released her debut album Pure Heroine. Its popularity was hailed by Clash as proof that ‘there’s still an intellectual, polished and important place for pop [music]’. She was 16 at the time. Four years on, Lorde launches back into our minds with Melodrama, which still buzzes with that potential energy—though it hasn’t all been plain-sailing. In a recent interview with The Guardian, she likened her fame-riddled celebrity friendships to ‘having a friend with an autoimmune disease’—‘there are certain places you can’t go together. Certain things you can’t do’. The insensitive analogy received backlash from fans, prompting Lorde to apologise on Twitter. While her conduct has been controversial, her music continues to question youth and power in a dynamic habitat of scorched harmonies, flinty 80s keyboard and lyrical wit.

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‘Melodrama’ by Sam McKinniss

 

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Flag Race // A Queer History of the Rainbow Flag

Happy Pride everyone! I hope everyone reading this is decked out head to toe in glitter, rainbows and body paint. To mark the momentous occasion, there has been a victory within the gay community; the pride react button is back on Facebook. Truly, this is an event up there in the pantheon of queer successes along with gay marriage, the return of Will & Grace and this.

Everyone loves rainbows right? They’re fun and colourful and 9/10 times there’s an untouched pot of gold at the end; surely that should be reason enough for the LGBTQ+ flag to be a rainbow right? And what’s up with the recent brown and black additions? What kind of rainbow has brown and black stripes? Let’s have a look at a brief history of the most fabulous flag the world has seen.

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Boshemia Magazine // Adventures at DC Zine Fest

This weekend, some of the American babes of Boshemia attended the 7th Annual D.C. Zine Fest [DCZF] to promote Boshemia Magazine in Washington, D.C.  On July 15, Becky J.—lead designer for the magazine—and I [Eileen] dropped off a stack of magazines at Zine Fest’s Day of Distro table and headed into the circus of nearly 900 visitors to mingle with zine-makers from the D.C. metro area.

Held at St. Stephen & the Incarnation Church in Northwest DC, the venue was perfect for such a gathering of creatives—it served as a literal sanctuary, a truly accessible and safe public space for people to come together. Zinesters, self-publishing artists and other independent creatives came from New York City, Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, and nearby D.C. neighborhoods to showcase their publications, prints, pins, buttons, hand-sewn books, stickers, magnets, and other lovely bits of art.

We're so excited for tomorrow! Bring your cash and come check out some super cool zines from the coolest zinesters. 10-4:30 at St. Stephen's
art by Austin Breed

So what is a zine, exactly? Zines exist at the intersection of activism and art, and appear in a vast array of mediums and forms; most literally, they are self-published small works, smaller than a traditional magazine and self-published. Created to be accessible, printed independently, and circulated easily, zines are often political in nature, and if not political, they are often informative or narrative works.

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Sigalit Landau // Barbed Hula (2001)

Winding through the tourist scattered streets of Málaga on a Sunday afternoon, sun beating down on me, I headed to El Centre de Pompidou, a smaller branch of the world famous contemporary art gallery in Paris. Making my way through the gallery, I stumbled across many striking exhibits, such as ‘Self Portraits’ which featured feminist icon Frida Kahlo’s The Frame (1938), as well as a sincerely thought provoking exhibit, ‘The Man Without A Face’. However, it was the gallery’s segment for ‘The Political Body’ that struck my attention most. This is where I discovered Sigalit Landau, an incredible Israeli female artist who uses video, sculpting, installation and her own body to create political art. Her art was astounding, but her message was even better.

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