Flag Race // A Queer History of the Rainbow Flag

Happy Pride everyone! I hope everyone reading this is decked out head to toe in glitter, rainbows and body paint. To mark the momentous occasion, there has been a victory within the gay community; the pride react button is back on Facebook. Truly, this is an event up there in the pantheon of queer successes along with gay marriage, the return of Will & Grace and this.

Everyone loves rainbows right? They’re fun and colourful and 9/10 times there’s an untouched pot of gold at the end; surely that should be reason enough for the LGBTQ+ flag to be a rainbow right? And what’s up with the recent brown and black additions? What kind of rainbow has brown and black stripes? Let’s have a look at a brief history of the most fabulous flag the world has seen.

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Continue reading “Flag Race // A Queer History of the Rainbow Flag”

Boshemia Magazine // Adventures at DC Zine Fest

This weekend, some of the American babes of Boshemia attended the 7th Annual D.C. Zine Fest [DCZF] to promote Boshemia Magazine in Washington, D.C.  On July 15, Becky J.—lead designer for the magazine—and I [Eileen] dropped off a stack of magazines at Zine Fest’s Day of Distro table and headed into the circus of nearly 900 visitors to mingle with zine-makers from the D.C. metro area.

Held at St. Stephen & the Incarnation Church in Northwest DC, the venue was perfect for such a gathering of creatives—it served as a literal sanctuary, a truly accessible and safe public space for people to come together. Zinesters, self-publishing artists and other independent creatives came from New York City, Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, and nearby D.C. neighborhoods to showcase their publications, prints, pins, buttons, hand-sewn books, stickers, magnets, and other lovely bits of art.

We're so excited for tomorrow! Bring your cash and come check out some super cool zines from the coolest zinesters. 10-4:30 at St. Stephen's
art by Austin Breed

So what is a zine, exactly? Zines exist at the intersection of activism and art, and appear in a vast array of mediums and forms; most literally, they are self-published small works, smaller than a traditional magazine and self-published. Created to be accessible, printed independently, and circulated easily, zines are often political in nature, and if not political, they are often informative or narrative works.

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Letters to June // 02

Throughout the month of June Boshemia will be publishing letters addressed to the most romantic month of the year.

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Dear June,

Your second week marks an impressive benchmark for Boshemia. It’s a little over a year now that we’ve been online, and now we are going to publish our first magazine. Today.

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It’s so appropriate that our magazine would land in June, the month of Pride, the month of celebrating love and visibility and rebellion and the happy beginnings of a new summer.

The enormity of this benchmark is not lost on me. For one, I am terribly nostalgic for print magazines—in such a way that I was always hoping that my old stacks of VOGUE, Bitch, and National Geographic would amount to more than just obsession, really. Happily, the magazine team shares in this obsession of reviving this “dying” medium, and their careful, masterful work speaks for itself.

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Hot Dating Tips for the Completely Undateable || A Poem

A spoken word poem by Boshemia regular Taylor Wear.  Taylor is a writer, a bruncher, and a young lover of old things. She will order whiskey and you’re allowed to think she’s doing it to impress you. Her favorite book and favorite shade of lipstick are both Lolita, a fabulous little coincidence. This poem first appeared here.

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HOT DATING TIPS FOR THE COMPLETELY FUCKING UNDATEABLE

when he tells you his favorite drink is an old fashioned,

smile politely.

allow him to think that he is suave, interesting,

the millennial Don Draper.

do not say oh that’s what my grandma orders.
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Voices of Resistance || 100 Days in Appalachia

Voices of Resistance is an ongoing project at Boshemia to share narratives of activism in the current geopolitical climate. If you would like your story of activism shared with our global feminist community, contact us at boshemia.blog@gmail.com. This is our first installment.

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For this first installment of Voices of Resistance, we turn to Appalachia—a region of the United States often overlooked—and remembered by many only for stereotypes of rural life, poverty, coal mining, and opioid abuse. This great swath of America has long endured sensationalized myths of identity and little media attention has been offered over the years to mitigate these perceptions.

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photo by Appalachian-American photographer Ashley Renee Hoffman

Appalachia describes the cultural and geographical region in the contiguous United States that stretches from southern New York to northern Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi. At the 2010 census, 25 million people were reported to inhabit this land of sleepy hollers and ancient mountains. That’s a substantial population to overlook, and that’s precisely what has happened.

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Baby Screams Miracle || A Review

From Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company, Howard Shalwitz presents an ominous production about a rural American family in crisis. In Baby Screams Miracle, Obie-award-winning playwright Clare Barron elegantly weaves a duality of calm and peril into an intimate exploration of prayer and the forces of nature against humanity. The play is a story of survival, familiar only in its investigation of how fragile we are against nature and God. Baby Screams Miracle is a story for the faithful and faithless alike about a family united tenuously by their will to survive. Continue reading “Baby Screams Miracle || A Review”

What Democracy Looks Like || Dispatches from the Women’s March on London, Washington, and These American Cities

On January 21st, 2017, millions of people around the globe marched in solidarity with women for a platform sparked by the guiding principles of the Women’s March on Washington. Estimated to be the largest one-day march in U.S. history alone, with three times as many people in attendance than at Trump’s inauguration, the Women’s March on Washington and the many sister marches of the world unified people from all walks of life under this platform: a call for civil rights, immigrant rights, reproductive freedom, LGBTQIA rights, environmental justice, and against violence. Women, nonbinary folks, men, and children took to the streets of every continent [thanks, Antartica!] to demand intersectional liberties and justice for all.

Here we have gathered photos and stories from American cities: New York, Pittsburgh, Santa Cruz, Seattle, and Washington, D.C, and of London, England. Boshemia staff writers Q and L share their experiences of marching on London together, and E reflects her experiences of marching on Washington, D.C.

This handful of testimonies is only a sample of the diverse lives who took to the streets of the world yesterday. We are grateful to our friends of the blog who have shared their stories and photographs with us.

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Washington, D.C.

Continue reading “What Democracy Looks Like || Dispatches from the Women’s March on London, Washington, and These American Cities”