Hot Dating Tips for the Completely Undateable || A Poem

A spoken word poem by Boshemia regular Taylor Wear.  Taylor is a writer, a bruncher, and a young lover of old things. She will order whiskey and you’re allowed to think she’s doing it to impress you. Her favorite book and favorite shade of lipstick are both Lolita, a fabulous little coincidence. This poem first appeared here.

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HOT DATING TIPS FOR THE COMPLETELY FUCKING UNDATEABLE

when he tells you his favorite drink is an old fashioned,

smile politely.

allow him to think that he is suave, interesting,

the millennial Don Draper.

do not say oh that’s what my grandma orders.
Continue reading “Hot Dating Tips for the Completely Undateable || A Poem”

Voices of Resistance || 100 Days in Appalachia

Voices of Resistance is an ongoing project at Boshemia to share narratives of activism in the current geopolitical climate. If you would like your story of activism shared with our global feminist community, contact us at boshemia.blog@gmail.com. This is our first installment.

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For this first installment of Voices of Resistance, we turn to Appalachia—a region of the United States often overlooked—and remembered by many only for stereotypes of rural life, poverty, coal mining, and opioid abuse. This great swath of America has long endured sensationalized myths of identity and little media attention has been offered over the years to mitigate these perceptions.

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photo by Appalachian-American photographer Ashley Renee Hoffman

Appalachia describes the cultural and geographical region in the contiguous United States that stretches from southern New York to northern Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi. At the 2010 census, 25 million people were reported to inhabit this land of sleepy hollers and ancient mountains. That’s a substantial population to overlook, and that’s precisely what has happened.

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Baby Screams Miracle || A Review

From Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company, Howard Shalwitz presents an ominous production about a rural American family in crisis. In Baby Screams Miracle, Obie-award-winning playwright Clare Barron elegantly weaves a duality of calm and peril into an intimate exploration of prayer and the forces of nature against humanity. The play is a story of survival, familiar only in its investigation of how fragile we are against nature and God. Baby Screams Miracle is a story for the faithful and faithless alike about a family united tenuously by their will to survive. Continue reading “Baby Screams Miracle || A Review”

What Democracy Looks Like || Dispatches from the Women’s March on London, Washington, and These American Cities

On January 21st, 2017, millions of people around the globe marched in solidarity with women for a platform sparked by the guiding principles of the Women’s March on Washington. Estimated to be the largest one-day march in U.S. history alone, with three times as many people in attendance than at Trump’s inauguration, the Women’s March on Washington and the many sister marches of the world unified people from all walks of life under this platform: a call for civil rights, immigrant rights, reproductive freedom, LGBTQIA rights, environmental justice, and against violence. Women, nonbinary folks, men, and children took to the streets of every continent [thanks, Antartica!] to demand intersectional liberties and justice for all.

Here we have gathered photos and stories from American cities: New York, Pittsburgh, Santa Cruz, Seattle, and Washington, D.C, and of London, England. Boshemia staff writers Q and L share their experiences of marching on London together, and E reflects her experiences of marching on Washington, D.C.

This handful of testimonies is only a sample of the diverse lives who took to the streets of the world yesterday. We are grateful to our friends of the blog who have shared their stories and photographs with us.

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Washington, D.C.

Continue reading “What Democracy Looks Like || Dispatches from the Women’s March on London, Washington, and These American Cities”

The Hard Problem || A Review

From the Studio Theatre in Washington, Tom Stoppard’s  The Hard Problem tackles classic thorny debates of philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience with a fresh perspective and ample wit. Directed by Matt Torney, the play is a sterling example of the signature style we have come to expect from Stoppard—a script that doesn’t shy from controversy or high-brow intellect. The Hard Problem is an elegant exploration of the complicated beliefs surrounding consciousness, faith in the divine, and how we endeavor to reconcile the unexplained.

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The cast of The Hard Problem, via Studio Theatre

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C’est Magnifique || How to do Paris in a Weekend, Boshemia-style.

This weekend L & Q welcomed in the New Year with a romantic jaunt to la belle Paris. From the time our plane landed to the time we left French soil again, our trip totalled almost exactly 48 hours. In that time we not only saw all the major tourist landmarks, but also absorbed some local culture and authentic Parisian charm. Here is how we did Paris in a weekend.

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Continue reading “C’est Magnifique || How to do Paris in a Weekend, Boshemia-style.”

This American Swamp || On Trump’s Dystopia and the American Problem

Emily Jessee returns to Boshemia to share her reflections on the weeks following the 2016 American election, dissecting The American Problem and looking ahead to Trump’s America. Emily is a young feminist creative who uses platforms like photography to portray the harshness and vulnerability of the world around her. 

 

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photo by Emily Jessee

 

It is as if reality has become something that dystopia cannot even begin to describe.

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