A Manifesto on a Woman’s Role in Modern Greece

Guest writer Margarita Chala writes her debut work for Boshemia on the role of women in modern Greece. Margarita is writer, mother, and dreamer from Andros.

kat-garcia-324271
photo by Kat Garcia // Unsplash

I look in the past, in those moments when women defiantly wrote their own chapters in history—I seek them out:

I read Sappho’s poetry.

I read about Aspasia’s influence on matters of politics during one of the most celebrated periods of culture, prosperity and Democracy, the Golden Age of Athens.

I get lost in the splendour of Maria Callas’ voice.

I read about Kallirhoe Parren, the first Greek feminist, journalist and publisher in 1888.

I read about Manto Mavrogenous’ heroism as a leader-warrior during the Greek War of Independence—leading her armada to war.

I look in the past and I can’t help but wonder; how progressive are we entitled to call ourselves today?

Continue reading “A Manifesto on a Woman’s Role in Modern Greece”

Women’s Wire Weekly // A Digest for the Feminists of DC

This interview is brought to Boshemia through a partnership with Femag.cz, an online feminist magazine based in the Czech Republic. The interview is by Daniela Jungova, Editor-in-Chief of Femag.cz. 

________________

“As feminist activists, it’s important to be able to have messy moments and learn from them”

Devon and Priya are the faces behind Women’s Wire Weekly—a digest for the feminists of DC. Fired up after the women’s march in January, Devon was looking to strengthen the newsletter she started in July 2016 and luckily she met Priya at a letter writing party and they joined forces soon after. The newsletter now includes an impressive list of hot topics from a wide range of fields, as well as job and volunteer opportunities and a list of events. For many in the area, Women’s Wire became the primary source of feminist news and a roadmap for activism in a time when almost every week brings more heartbreaking events.

I [Daniela Jungova] sat down with both of them to talk about their personal politics, clashes within the feminist movement, and hopes for the future.

priyadevon
From left: Priya Kvam and Devon Haynes. Photo provided by Daniela Jungova.

Continue reading “Women’s Wire Weekly // A Digest for the Feminists of DC”

Notes on Regaining Autonomy II // Loss and Loneliness

Boshemia staff Elisha writes from her very core in the second installment of “Notes on Regaining Autonomy“.

___________________________________________________________________

The passing of time is a strange and powerful entity.

The proverbial saying is that time heals all wounds.

But what time masterfully produces in equal part,

Is the culling of experiences:

A “collected works” comprised of joy, struggle, learning, love, and loss.

aaron-burden-215162

Continue reading “Notes on Regaining Autonomy II // Loss and Loneliness”

Beyond Words // the Language of Otherness

Guest post by Juliette Rapp. Juliette is an American post-grad gone rogue who moved to Rome last year in search of “something to write about.” She hopes to one day move to a small village in a seaside cliff, become a recluse, and write taunting letters to her student loan providers. In her free verse, she writes about navigating the lexical gap between bilingual lovers, at once made Other by their cultures and the emotional residue they bring to each other.

john-towner-125995.jpg
photogaphy by John Towner

We have just finished making love. I am lying in your bed,

vaguely aware of the differences in our consciousness.

In the stillness, I blink away the seductive sirens of sleep.

We made love for over an hour,

Or maybe it was closer to like.

Good-enough, for this moment.

Almost me and you.

Continue reading “Beyond Words // the Language of Otherness”

Remembering Charlottesville: Notes from the Frontlines

Guest writer Khristian Smith shares his experience as a counter-protester of the ‘Unite the Right Rally’ at Charlottesville on August 11 – 12, 2017. 

igor-ovsyannykov-223082 (1)

Late in the evening on August 11, I turned away from my work to find that hundreds of real-life Nazis had descended onto the Grounds at the University of Virginia. I honestly wish I could say I was surprised by their clandestine march or the fact that they were wielding torches, but given the City of Charlottesville’s, UVA’s, and Thomas Jefferson’s histories, pretending to be surprised would be dishonest and as much an assent to the violence that inevitably followed as, say, a condemnation of violence “on many sides.” Fortunately, I was not alone in my lack of surprise.

As hundreds of torch-wielding white supremacists marched their way across the lawn to the Rotunda, 20+ third and fourth year students created a wall around the Rotunda’s statue of Jefferson. These students linked arms, held signs, and met “you will not replace us” and “blood and soil” with “Black Lives Matter” and civil disobedience. Their nonviolent determent of (mostly) white men retained even when “blood and soil” transformed into “we have the right to beat you.”

Continue reading “Remembering Charlottesville: Notes from the Frontlines”

Lorde’s ‘Melodrama’ // On Vulnerability & Power in Pop

Eve Jones examines Lorde’s latest album, Melodrama. Eve is a 19-year-old writer and waitress from Plymouth. Obsessive by nature, she’s always in pursuit of some delicious syntax. This is her first article for Boshemia.

Lorde: explorations of youth and power

In 2013, Lorde, aka Ella Yelich-O’Connor, released her debut album Pure Heroine. Its popularity was hailed by Clash as proof that ‘there’s still an intellectual, polished and important place for pop [music]’. She was 16 at the time. Four years on, Lorde launches back into our minds with Melodrama, which still buzzes with that potential energy—though it hasn’t all been plain-sailing. In a recent interview with The Guardian, she likened her fame-riddled celebrity friendships to ‘having a friend with an autoimmune disease’—‘there are certain places you can’t go together. Certain things you can’t do’. The insensitive analogy received backlash from fans, prompting Lorde to apologise on Twitter. While her conduct has been controversial, her music continues to question youth and power in a dynamic habitat of scorched harmonies, flinty 80s keyboard and lyrical wit.

Image result for melodrama sam mckinnis
‘Melodrama’ by Sam McKinniss

 

Continue reading “Lorde’s ‘Melodrama’ // On Vulnerability & Power in Pop”

Sigalit Landau // Barbed Hula (2001)

Winding through the tourist scattered streets of Málaga on a Sunday afternoon, sun beating down on me, I headed to El Centre de Pompidou, a smaller branch of the world famous contemporary art gallery in Paris. Making my way through the gallery, I stumbled across many striking exhibits, such as ‘Self Portraits’ which featured feminist icon Frida Kahlo’s The Frame (1938), as well as a sincerely thought provoking exhibit, ‘The Man Without A Face’. However, it was the gallery’s segment for ‘The Political Body’ that struck my attention most. This is where I discovered Sigalit Landau, an incredible Israeli female artist who uses video, sculpting, installation and her own body to create political art. Her art was astounding, but her message was even better.

2015_malaga_1149_mag_p-45_malaga

Continue reading “Sigalit Landau // Barbed Hula (2001)”